Winter in France – Recipes Using Seasonal Produce

Winter in France – Recipes Using Seasonal Produce

February 13, 2014
0 3515 1
Winter in France – Recipes Using Seasonal Produce

Winter in France – Recipes Using Seasonal Produce

“Eating Seasonally & Locally” is a notion that many of us have lost touch with since strawberries are so easy to find in December, courgettes in February and mangoes in Paris. The international food industry has successfully made every fruit & vegetable permanently accessible to us, even when not in season and grown thousands of miles away. One of the many downsides to this system is that the produce needs to be conditioned in order to travel around the world so by the time it reaches us it’s ‘freshness’ is debatable to say the least.

France’s culinary traditions have helped them resist this crazy system and made them less willing to comprise on quality. This means that local produce, which is not frozen, treated or preserved, will always be their first priority, anything that falls short is simply not considered. They plan their meals based on the best available produce, not the other way around.

The French tend to shop little and often, avoiding the bulk supermarket shop we all loathe. They very rarely go shopping and stock up on frozen foods or treated produce to last the month because they simply prefer things ‘straight from the vine’. If you’ve ever wandered through a bustling French market you will have noticed that shopping is a pleasure here rather than a chore. Seasonality is at the heart of the noisy market banter where vendors offer advice, recipes and encourage you to try before you buy.

Oh and don’t forget the colours and variety. The displays are artworks and the different choices will leave you wanting to try it all. The great news is that with fresh & ripe basic produce, rustling up a delicious meal is easy, quick and fun. So if you haven’t tried it, or have lost the habit, we hope that some simple seasonal recipes from a local chef will tempt you back to the market and your kitchen.

This month we asked Riviera Chef Eliane, from La Serviette Blanche, to share a couple of mouthwatering but simple February recipes. She came up with this tasty meal of Slow Cooked Sausages with Buttery Cabbage and French Lemon Tart. YUM!

To join one of Eliane’s cookery classes in Cannes book HERE…

Photos provided by Mira Maclean

Slow Cooked Sausages with Buttery Cabbage
Recipe provided by Riviera Chef Eliane
Servings Prep Time
6 people 20 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 people 20 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Slow Cooked Sausages with Buttery Cabbage
Recipe provided by Riviera Chef Eliane
Servings Prep Time
6 people 20 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 people 20 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Add the cabbage and cook for about 10 minutes. Drain in a colander and press on the cabbage to remove as much water as possible.
  2. In a flameproof casserole dish, melt 45g of the butter over medium heat. Add the onion and carrot until lightly browned. Add the cabbage and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Reduce the heat to low, cover and let cook for 40 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile in a large skillet, melt the remaining 30g of butter over medium-low heat. Add the sausages and cook until lightly browned all over, approximately 8 minutes.
  4. Spread the cabbage on a warmed serving dish and place the sausages on top.
French Lemon Tart
Recipe by Riviera Chef Eliane
Servings
6 people
Servings
6 people
French Lemon Tart
Recipe by Riviera Chef Eliane
Servings
6 people
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
For the pastry
For the filling
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. To make the pastry, put the flour, sugar and a pinch of salt in a food processor and pulse briefly to the mix. Add the diced butter and pulse until well combined. With the motor running, add the egg yolks and continue to mix until it comes together into a dough. Remove from processor and shape into a disc and wrap in clear plastic wrap and chill for about an hour. Dough should be pliable but not sticky to the touch.
  2. Preheat the oven to 190degC. Roll out the pastry until about half cm thick. Grease a round or fluted tart tin with butter and line rolled out dough. Refrigerate until firm, then line with parchment or greaseproof paper and baking beans, and blind bake for about 15mins until golden, then remove the paper and beans and brush thebase with egg white to seal. Put back in the oven for another 8mins. Remove from the oven and turn off.
  3. To make the filling, finely zest the lemons into a heatproof bowl, add 225g fine sugar and rub together with your fingers. Stir in the eggs and the juice of 3 and half lemons, and then set the bowl over a pan of simmering water making sure the bottom of the bowl it doesn't touch the water.
  4. Heat, whisking gently but continuously until it thickens to a lemon curd texture. This takes about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat but leaving the pan to cool for 10mins, then stir in the butter and process with a blender until smooth. Scoop into the tart pan and smooth the top to cool completely.
  5. Meanwhile, cut the remaining lemon into thin slices and remove the pips. Place to soften in the pan of simmering water for about 10mins.
  6. Make the simple syrup by dissolving the remaining 50g sugar in 50ml water in a pot and bring to the boil. Add the lemon slices and simmer for about 10mins, then remove with a slotted spoon and arrange on top of the tart. Brush the tart with the remaining syrup and allow to set before serving.
  7. Serve with dallop of creme fraiche.
  8. Enjoy!
, , , , ,

Professional freelance feature writer, blogger, content researcher and copyright specialist. Currently studying her BSc Hons Environmental Science. Adventure and ocean junkie.

View my other posts

Leave a Reply